Articles

Accessibility Companion Brief

Why an Accessible Act?


Learn About a Career in Non-Profits as a Great Life Option (VIDEO 1)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsyekL5a_Gs

 

Work life at Non-Profit (Interviews of Non-Profit Employees) (VIDEO 2)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nf1QLPoEoqs


COVID 19 Emergency Benefits Compilation

This information has been adapted from information compiled and published freely by Dr. Jennifer Robson, Associate Professor of Political Management at Carleton University.  You can read the original document at: https://t.co/m0dXFYIZwk?amp+1   Dr. Robson is not affiliates with this website or its publishers. 

COVID 19 Emergency Benefits Compilation

Alberta Hate Crimes Committee: Language

Alberta Hate Crimes Committee: Language

Important Announcement: Alberta’s Autism Community Response to the Special Education Crisis 
Autism representative of Autism Society Alberta, Autism Edmonton, Autism Calgary, Chinook Autism Society, and Autism Society of the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo have united efforts to address province wide concerns. 
Following the announcement of Alberta Government’s 2020 Budget, Alberta Education released the Interim Funding Manual for School Authorities 2020/21. Significant changes were made to the funding framework for diverse learners from ESC thru grade 12.  It is the position of Alberta’s collective Autism Societies that the new approach is detrimental to students on the autism spectrum.  We have recommended that Premier Kenny reject the Interim Funding Manual for School Authorities 2020/2021 School Year and that the Minister of Education engage all stakeholders (especially parents) in the development of a much more thoughtful and strategic approach. 
We initially focused our attention on Early Education (PUF), but as we began to analyze impacts for elementary, middle and high school students it became clear that the funding framework does not position students on the autism spectrum to succeed at all stages across the lifelong learning path. Public, independent, private, charter, and online programs are all adversely impacted. 
By uniting the efforts of Autism community groups across the province, we will collectively build a Mobilizing Families initiative. The objectives of the individuals and families living with ASD: ·       Respond to current and immediate challenges faced by individuals and families·       Empower those living with ASD to be strong advocates ·       Inspire increased opportunities to work collaboratively with the government ·       Position all stakeholders to speak to the diverse needs of our community 
Please stay tuned to news circulated through provincial and local Autism networks.

2020 03 08 Autism Response Letter


Minister Toews to speak with Albertans

January 24, 2020 Media inquiries

Government is hosting telephone town halls to listen to Albertans’ ideas and priorities for Budget 2020.

Two telephone town hall meetings, on Jan. 27 and Jan. 28, will give Albertans the opportunity to ask questions and provide their views on the provincial budget and Alberta’s finances.

“Telephone town halls are an opportunity for us to speak directly to Albertans and listen to their priorities. In the lead-up to Budget 2019, we were able to connect with almost 35,000 people across Alberta. Their feedback helped inform the budget and I am looking forward to hearing from Albertans again.”

Travis Toews, President of Treasury Board and Minister of Finance

Albertans with a publicly listed phone number will automatically receive a call to participate. Residents who live north of Red Deer will receive a call on Jan. 27 and those who live in Red Deer and southern Alberta will receive a call on Jan. 28. People are also invited to listen and participate online.

How it works

  • The telephone town halls will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. reaching residents in:
    • northern Alberta (all communities north of Red Deer) on Monday, Jan. 27
    • southern Alberta (Red Deer and all communities south) on Tuesday, Jan. 23
  • Publicly listed telephone numbers (those not on the national or provincial do not call list) will be dialed and invited to participate in the call.
  • Participants can choose to register online in advance.
  • People may also dial into the call toll-free at 1-877-229-8493, and enter the code 115500.
  • Albertans may also listen and submit questions
  • The 90-minute call will be moderated. A question-and-answer period will follow after opening remarks.
  • No personal information will be saved or used by the Government of Alberta.

Participants’ comments will help frame decisions for Budget 2020 and future budgets. Albertans can continue to provide their comments for the budget online until Feb. 7.

Related information

 Media inquiries

Jerrica Goodwin

587-988-3278
Press Secretary, Treasury Board and Finance    




The Mental Health Act is the main piece of legislation in Alberta that deals with the assessment, treatment and rights of people with a serious mental
disorder (illness) in certain situations.
 
The act talks about how a person with a mental disorder can be apprehended, detained and/or given treatment in a hospital or in the community under specified conditions. It also explains people's rights in these circumstances.
 The Government of Alberta is looking for input regarding the Mental Health Act through an online survey that will be open until January 20, 2020.

Your feedback is important.

Want to learn more?
A backgrounder with more information about the Mental Health Act  and this review is available here.

  TAKE SURVEY



January 26!

5-6 PM A reading of a play I wrote called Tune to A! (about inclusion and the arts)

7-10  - A community discussion about ableism in the arts and what the arts professionals can do to bridge the gap and welcome artists and patrons of the arts. 

 Both events  are free!  You don't have to come to both if you don't want to.

 The link below allows you to register and note your accessibility accommodations.  Just so that we know how many chairs to expect etc.  

 https://www.citadeltheatre.com/artists-learning/artist-experiences/the-exchange 


Empower U Webinar: Right to Education, Perspectives of Post-Secondary Student Leaders With Disabilities January 22nd! 
Join the Nothing About Us Without Us: Empower U, Learn to Access Your Disability Rights team for Empower U webinars to get more in-depth information about the rights of persons with disabilities in Canada, and how various organizations use human rights perspective to ensure rights, inclusion and equality of persons with disabilities. 
Our first webinar is on the Right to Education, Perspectives of Post-Secondary Student Leaders With Disabilities on Wednesday, January 22nd from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST. Captioning will be provided. 
Speakers:
Nadia Kanani, Advocacy and Finance Coordinator, Students for Barrier-free Access, University of Toronto
Kat Kahnert-Wolchak, Coordinator, York Federation of Students Access Centre, York University
Morgan Sears, Cody Joy & Julia Abundo, Managing Team, Memorial Disability Information Support Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland 
Register for the webinar here: https://secure.neads.ca/register/en.php?id=20ON
On the day of the webinar access the session through this Zoom meeting link:
https://zoom.us/j/119496434
Meeting ID: 119-496-434 (No password needed)
Optional teleconference: 1-647-558-0588 
Description: A series of ten webinars will offer training for people with disabilities who are willing to make a commitment to share their knowledge in their communities / organizations with their peers for the purpose of increased awareness of how to remedy discrimination using more familiar (Human Rights Codes) and newer instruments (United Nations Convention on The Rights of Persons With Disabilities (CRPD) and the CRPD's Optional Protocol to train other people to do likewise. 
Learning Objectives:
• To increase the number of Canadians with disabilities, particularly youth with disabilities and people with disabilities from ethno-cultural communities, who are knowledgeable about available human rights remedies to discrimination and how to access these remedies
• To increase capacity of Canadians with disabilities to share that knowledge with their peers so that more people across Canada (particularly with disabilities and multi-ethnic communities) will have the information necessary to navigate the systems where Canadians can seek redress for discriminationLearning Outcomes - At the end of the training participants will have:
• In-depth knowledge of how to use United Nations Convention on The Rights of Persons With Disabilities (CRPD) and the Optional Protocol, as well as Human Rights Codes and the Accessible Canada Act
• In-depth understanding of how to access and navigate the systems where Canadians with disabilities can seek redress from discrimination 
Webinars will be held every Wednesday at 1.00 pm EST from January 22 to March 25, 2020. Recordings will be available to participants after webinars. 
About the Project:The project Nothing About Us Without Us: Empower U, Learn to Access Your Disability Rights is funded by Employment and Social Development Canada and implemented by the Council of Canadians with Disabilities (CCD) in collaboration with the Canadian Multicultural Disability Centre Inc. (CMDCI), Citizens With Disabilities – Ontario (CWDO), the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities (MLPD) and the National Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS).https://www.neads.ca/en/about/media/index.php?id=879 
 
Frank SmithNational CoordinatorNational Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS)Rm. 514 Unicentre, Carleton UniversityOttawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6, tel. (613) 380-8065, ext. 201Subscribe to NEAD2know, your monthly Canadian post-secondary accessibility updatehttps://www.neads.ca/https://www.disabilityawards.ca/http://breakingitdown.neads.ca/https://www.facebook.com/myNEADS/https://www.canadahelps.org/dn/344


Two upcoming Fair Deal Panel town halls

January 06, 2020 Media inquiries
Alberta’s Fair Deal Panel will hold its next two town hall meetings in Fort McMurray and Fort Saskatchewan on Jan. 8 and Jan. 9.The Fair Deal Panel is consulting Albertans on how best to define and secure a fair deal for the province. The panel members are exploring ideas that give the province a bigger voice within the federation, increase power over areas of provincial jurisdiction and advance vital economic interests.The Fort McMurray town hall is taking place on Wednesday, Jan. 8 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Quality Inn and Conference Centre. Seating capacity is limited so participants should register to attend.The town hall in Fort Saskatchewan is on Thursday, Jan. 9 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Lion’s Banquet Hall in the Dow Centennial Centre. Capacity is limited, so those interested in attending should register in advance.Albertans are encouraged to attend local town hall sessions and share their vision of how Alberta can achieve a fairer deal.All Albertans will have the opportunity to provide their input online and through other forms of direct feedback as the panel conducts its public consultations until Jan. 30. More information on how to participate is available at www.fairdeal.ca.In addition to receiving input from Albertans, the Fair Deal Panel will consult with policy experts and undertake research to inform its recommendations. The panel will complete its report to the government by March 31.
Related information

Beryl Cullum
Communications Director, Intergovernmental Relations    
Related news


Media inquiries
780-644-8817



CJDS Twitter Chat - Disability in Post-Secondary Classrooms Public · Hosted by The Canadian Journal of Disability Studies

Are you a faculty member, instructor, or Teaching Assistant at a post-secondary institution? What education have you received around accommodations for disabled students? You may have received some instruction on your institution’s duty to accommodate policy, but chances are that understanding the barriers disabled undergraduate and graduate students encounter in their programs has not been a critical focus of your pedagogical training.   

Relatedly, are you a graduate student, instructor, or faculty member with disabilities? What are your experiences with accommodations?  What do you want post-secondary educators to know about being disabled?

Utilizing Twitter because of its ability to unite people over different geographies and time zones, in addition to the ways the platform has been employed as an activist tool amongst disabled peoples, the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies is hosting a Twitter chat on disability in post-secondary classrooms on Thursday January 9th from 7:45pm-8:45pm ET. Using the chat hashtag #CJDSChat, participants will be entering into a guided discussion on the way disability impacts students in higher education.

Moderated by Danielle Lorenz, the Knowledge Mobilization Editor of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, and PhD candidate in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Alberta, the chat will ask participants to consider what they think they know about disability in post-secondary settings.

Send an RSVP tweet to @TheCJDS – and don’t forget the #CJDSChat hashtag!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1196180254104761/

https://www.neads.ca/en/about/media/index.php?id=873

 

Frank Smith

National Coordinator

National Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS)

Rm. 514 Unicentre, Carleton University

Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6, tel. (613) 380-8065, ext. 201

Subscribe to NEAD2know, your monthly Canadian post-secondary accessibility update

https://www.neads.ca/

https://www.disabilityawards.ca/



CNIB
We have many clients who are waiting for Vision Mates in rural areas, especially Northern Alberta. And it is incredibly hard for us to find volunteers in these communities, when we are not physically in them or have connections. So while the volunteer department continues doing our best and researching and reaching out, we are also hoping you can help.

 Maybe you have connections in one of these communities. Maybe as you are going home for the holidays, you remember that your Great Aunt Mildred grew up in Vegreville and knows people or that Cousin Bobby Joe used to work in Cold Lake and has friends. Or you happen to be high school friends with someone that runs a community organization in Yellowknife. So if you can keep these communities in mind and mention it to people or help us make any connections that you have, that would be so appreciated.

 We believe that people in any area deserve a vision mate and we really want to help them. Here is the list of communities we are looking for volunteers in. Anything you can do to help would be amazing. Even 1 volunteer in 1 community can make a world of difference to that 1 client.

  •  Vegreville
  • Leduc
  • Provost
  • Spruce Grove
  • Sherwood Park (Spanish speaking volunteer needed)
  • Cold Lake
  • Lloydminster
  • Sturgeon County
  • Fort Saskatchewan
  • Claresholm
  • St Albert
  • St Paul
  • Yellowknife

Vision Mate Application Form



Career Launcher Internships: Good news! New internship funds for 2020!
Do you want to help employers hire students or grads?
Help employers get a head start on their recruitment – connect them to Colleges and Institutes Canada’s (CICan) Career-Launcher Internships. They provide up to $20,000 towards salary for 6-12 months.
After helping employers create 380 internships this past year, new subsidies will be available in the spring.
Employers can submit their internship now to get on the waitlist and be the first to know when the new funding becomes available in 2020. It’s quick and simple! 
Funded by the Government of Canada as part of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy, Career-Launcher Internships are proud to work with the National Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS) to increase awareness of our program and get more students and grads to access jobs in sectors that are in demand. 
About Career-Launcher Internships
The Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) Career-Launcher Internship program connects employers with skilled grads by providing up to $20,000 towards an intern’s salary.
Career-Launcher Internships have streams in digital tech, clean tech and natural resources that facilitate the transition of highly-skilled postsecondary grads to a rapidly changing labour market. This program is funded by the Government of Canada as part of the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy.https://www.neads.ca/en/about/media/index.php?id=857
Fair Deal Panel town hall set for Grande Prairie


December 17, 2019 Media inquiries

Alberta’s Fair Deal Panel will hold its fifth open town hall meeting in Grande Prairie on Dec. 18.

The Fair Deal Panel is consulting Albertans on how best to define and secure a fair deal for the province. They're exploring ideas that give the province a bigger voice within the federation, increase power over areas of provincial jurisdiction and advance vital economic interests.

The Grande Prairie town hall will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 18 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Teresa Sargent Hall. Seating capacity is limited so participants should register to attend.

Albertans are encouraged to attend local town hall sessions and share their vision of how Alberta can achieve a fairer deal. Additional town hall locations and dates are being confirmed.

All Albertans will have the opportunity to provide their input online and through other forms of direct feedback as the panel conducts its public consultations until Jan. 30, 2020. More information on how to participate is available at www.fairdeal.ca.

In addition to receiving input from Albertans, the Fair Deal Panel will consult with policy experts and undertake research to inform its recommendations. The panel will complete its report to the government by March 31, 2020.

Related information

Related information


CPAA Program registration for the Spring Session
The CPAA offers programs to people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities that provide essential social interaction and healthy activities in nurturing environments.  We believe that sport, recreation and leisure activities foster a balance between mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Program registration for the Spring Session which opens the first week in February is now open!  Programs available for this session include:
•           Aqua Therapy (Children 2 - 12)
•           Art Expressions (Adults 18 & over)
•           ComputAbilities (Adults 18 & over)
•           CookAbilities (Adults 18 & over)
•           Morning Bliss Yoga (Adults 18 & over)
•           Tempo Gusto Music Therapy (Adults 18 & over)
•           Tranquil Movements Yoga (Adults 18 & over)
•           Sound Connection Music Therapy (Adults 18 & over) 
If you do not have access to a credit card or paypal account, simply click on the invoice feature for your payment option.  You’ll be prompted to complete the billing contact information and an invoice will be emailed to that individual/organization for payment processing. If you’re interested in participating in one of our exciting programs please click the link below. We look forward to seeing you at one of our classes!Warm Regards,The CPAA Programs Team 
To register for our event! Register NowTo learn more about CPAA Edmonton Programs!
Event Home Page

5 Meaningful Ways To Teach Your Child About Disabilities
BY DYAN ROBSON, AND NEXT COMES L
DEC 19, 2018

You've probably encountered some viral video where an able-bodied person is celebrated for doing something nice for a disabled person. Stories like the girl being applauded for asking the autistic kid to the prom.While on the surface these “inspirational” stories seem all warm and fuzzy, they are problematic for a variety of reasons. Stories like these make it seem like you'll be some kind of hero for befriending an autistic child, like my son.And that's messed up.


So if you really want our children to be friends, here are five ways you can teach your kid about disabilities and inclusion.1. Read About Disabilities TogetherReading books is a great starting point. There are plenty of picture books that discuss disabilities and inclusion. Books are a useful tool because they are a natural springboard to conversation — talk about autism, ADHD, sensory processing disorder, hearing impairment, visual impairment, etc. Take the time to explain what it is, and how it may affect people.Awareness helps reduce the stigma that accompanies a lot of these disabilities.


2. Answer Your Child's Questions With HonestyChildren are curious creatures and often, many people with disabilities welcome the chance to answer your children's questions.I'm sure we've all had a child ask a question, usually in a loud voice, about something they see like, "Why does that person only have one leg?" or "Why is that kid covering his ears and screaming?" You probably get embarrassed, maybe even panic a little, hoping that the person didn't hear your child's question. Or maybe you even try to shush your child as a way to avoid answering the awkward questions.But here's the thing… What are you teaching your child when you respond that way?Answering these questions, especially in public, can be hard, but it's important to answer your child's questions honestly. Explain why some people might need wheelchairs to get around. Teach them about service dogs and why we can't pet or touch these animals when we see them.Children are curious creatures and often, many people with disabilities welcome the chance to answer your children's questions. You can always ask the person themselves if they would be willing to answer your child's questions.You should also give your children the vocabulary and terms they need to understand these disabilities. Teach them words like autistic, for instance. Explain that not all disabilities are visible.


3. Celebrate Your Child's UniquenessBy celebrating your child's unique qualities, you are indirectly teaching them about how other people are unique and special too. And hopefully, your child will learn to look for and celebrate the unique qualities of others.


More recommended readingMy Autistic Son Has Nothing To Be Sorry For — He's Wonderful, Thanks


4. Teach Your Child About Inclusion And Model It!There are plenty of ways to model inclusion to your child and they're often simple things to do.For example, there is an autistic boy at my children's school who loves to say hi to every single person that enters the school. You would be surprised how many people simply walk right past him without saying hi. It breaks my heart. How hard is it to simply wave or say hi back to him?So, just do it — say hi. That simple gesture helps him feel accepted and that he belongs. Plus, you don't look like a jerk for ignoring him.Teach your kids to ask others to join them, even if the other kid seems quirky or weird. It can be as simple as including them at recess time or holding the door open for someone in a wheelchair.


5. Teach Your Child To Be KindIt seems obvious, I know, but perhaps the most important thing you can do is to teach your child about the importance of being kind to others.Remind them that they don't have to like everyone, but they should still be polite and kind to everyone they encounter.Kindness and respect goes a long way.Similarly, you should teach your child about bullying. Specifically, what bullying is, how to identify a bully, and what to do when they encounter bullying (either towards them or others). By giving your child this information, they may feel confident standing up for those quirky and different kids that end up being bullied during the school years.The bottom line is this though: Don't teach your child to be my son's friend simply because he's autistic and different. He's not some pity-party.Instead, teach your child to be my son's friend simply because they genuinely like him for who he is.


Streamlined access to seniors resources

December 12, 2019 Media inquiries

In 2020, seniors will have one number to call for information, advocacy and referrals regarding Alberta government services.

The Office of the Seniors Advocate will be combined with the Office of the Health Advocates to address seniors’ concerns more efficiently. Beginning Jan. 2, 2020, Alberta seniors, their families and service providers will be able to access information and referrals on issues of concern at a centralized organization. Staff and resources from the Office of the Seniors Advocate will be transferred to the Office of the Health Advocates to support this change.

The Alberta Health Advocates can be reached at 780-422-1812 or online at albertahealthadvocates.ca

This transition aligns with the completion of Seniors Advocate Dr. Sheree Kwong See’s secondment from the University of Alberta and the expiration of her appointment as Seniors Advocate on Dec. 31, 2019.

“I would to thank Dr. Sheree Kwong See for her service to seniors and their families, and wish her well as she returns to teaching and her academic career. The decision to combine offices is a thoughtful and prudent decision and will help seniors and those supporting them access services easily in one place.”Josephine Pon, Minister of Seniors and Housing

Our government values seniors and we’re putting a high priority on increasing access to continuing care and other services they need. The Health Advocates serve all Albertans, and this change aligns with other health services for seniors, from prescription drug benefits to Protection of Persons in Care.”Tyler Shandro, Minister of Health

Additionally, general inquiries about all government services can be made to Alberta Supports at 1-877-644-9992 and at any Alberta Supports office (find your local office at albertasupports.ca). 


Natalie Tomczak
587-596-8187
Press Secretary, Seniors and Housing     
Related information
Media inquiries



First Fair Deal Panel town hall set for Edmonton   

CALL TO ACTION FAIR CALGARY COMMUNITY VOICES
&
FCCV letter to City Council Nov 2019

CALL TO ACTION FAIR CALGARY COMMUNITY VOICES & FCCV letter to City Council Nov 2019


Accessibility: A Good Business Decision

Check out our article on Businesslink about how accessibility is good for business:     

https://businesslink.ca/blog/accessibility-a-good-business-decision


AISH increase 2018

VAD is happy to celebrate with individuals with disabilities the long overdue call for the indexing for AISH. An Act to Combat Poverty and Fight for Albertans with Disabilities has been introduced to legislation. If passed, Bill 26 would increase core and supplementary benefits for AISH, going up each year to keep up with inflation, as measured by the Consumer Price Index.

The bill increases the maximum monthly core benefit rate for a single person covered by AISH to $1,685 from $1,588. If passed, Bill 26 would take effect Jan. 1, 2019. The legislation would mark the first increase to AISH benefits since 2012. The legislation would increase savings limits to match general eligibility criteria for AISH.  

AISH Increase 2018

AISH Employment Income Exception Calculation Examples 2019

Update on Changes to Ride Transit Program Edmonton


The reinstatement for people on AISH to pay for their transit pass through pre-authorized bank withdrawal and to receive the pass by mail comes into effect for the August Pass. Data from the City of Edmonton indicates that 767 have enrolled as of June 26th and will receive their transit pass in the mail in August. As of July 5th, 908 people have registered for mailout of passes for September. The mailout for September is July 26th so if you know of people who are interested in receiving the pass by mail encourage them to get the application and Pre-Authorization Withdrawal completed. The forms are available on the Voice of Albertans Website, links below.


Thanks again for your support of the advocacy that took place to make this change happen.

Terms and Conditions - Pre-Authorized Debit (PAD)

AISH FAQ

Ride Transit Pass Edmonton Now Available for AISH Recipients through the Mail

Voice of Albertans with Disabilities wants to thank the Individuals and Organizations who brought their voice forward to the City of Edmonton outlining the difficulties introduced by the pass distribution process of the Ride Transit Program. Your voice has made a difference. The many letters of concern, phone calls, meetings with City Council Members and organized presentations by Voice of Albertans to the Accessibility Advisory Committee and City Council has been heard.

Thank you to Edmonton City Council for listening and directing the reinstatement for people on AISH to pay for their transit pass through pre-authorized bank withdrawal and to receive the pass by mail.

Information is being mailed to approx. 6,700 AISH applicants on May 28-29 introducing the changed process and how to apply. The following links will take you to the information on the change and how to access the pre-authorization and monthly mail out for Ride Transit Passes. Pass this notice on so individuals and families can watch for this welcome news.

Changes to Ride Transit Pass Letter

FAQs

Together we hold the power! Get involved with VAD and make a difference. We have a number of active groups and committees moving forward inclusion and accessibility for all. Call 780-488-9088.